Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

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Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Formstack
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October 3, 2013
Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

MIN
/
October 3, 2013
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Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Blog

The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

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Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Panelists
No items found.
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The Top 5 Myths About Cloud Storage

Check out this blog where we dissect the top 5 myths encountered when researching cloud storage solutions.
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Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Collecting payments with online forms is easy, but first, you have to choose the right payment gateway. Browse the providers in our gateway credit card processing comparison chart to find the best option for your business. Then sign up for Formstack Forms, customize your payment forms, and start collecting profits in minutes.

Online Payment Gateway Comparison Chart

NOTE: These amounts reflect the monthly subscription for the payment provider. Formstack does not charge a fee to integrate with any of our payment partners.

FEATURES
Authorize.Net
Bambora
Chargify
First Data
PayPal
PayPal Pro
PayPal Payflow
Stripe
WePay
ProPay
Monthly Fees
$25
$25
$149+
Contact First Data
$0
$25
$0-$25
$0
$0
$4
Transaction Fees
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.9% + 30¢
N/A
Contact First Data
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.9% + 30¢
10¢
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.6% + 30¢
Countries
5
8
Based on payment gateway
50+
203
3
4
25
USA
USA
Currencies
11
2
23
140
25
23
25
135+
1
1
Card Types
6
13
Based on payment gateway
5
9
9
5
6
4
4
Limits
None
None
Based on payment gateway
None
$10,000
None
None
None
None
$500 per transaction
Form Payments
Recurring Billing
Mobile Payments
PSD2 Compliant

Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

Any good IT manager researches before moving data to the cloud, and some of the first articles you’ll find on the Internet report concerns and security issues regarding cloud reliability.

How serious is the problem? Far and away, many security concerns are based on bad myths. With reputable cloud hosting, company data is more secure, and the accompanying added convenience allows IT managers to focus on more important issues. Here's why.

Myth 1: Cloud Storage is Less Secure than Local Storage

Hosting data in the cloud can be more secure than hosting locally, provided the cloud host and IT manager work together. First, local storage rarely uses encryption. Some local data centers are the exception, but most IT firms store data without encryption. This can be a problem that fails to keep certain industry security standards. Additionally, if the locally stored data is encrypted, there’s usually a good chance those encryption keys are stored in the same location. With cloud hosting, the data is encrypted at the host, and the business can store keys on its local network. This separates the encrypted data from its decryption source, making it more secure in the cloud.

Myth 2: The Cloud Complicates Architecture

Cloud computing requires knowledge of the Internet, but cloud infrastructure is typically new to an IT manager moving data to cloud storage. The cloud can actually make it easier to manage resources and data. Most cloud hosts offer a dashboard where the manager can log in and scale settings from a user-friendly interface. This means that managers can add terabytes and even petabytes of storage to their data center within minutes. There’s no need for purchasing equipment, finding space or waiting days for the space to be available.

Myth 3: Getting Stuck with One Cloud Provider

Some cloud hosts have proprietary systems, and the customer gets stuck with the same hosts. Reputable hosts offer resilient ways to move between different cloud hosts. For instance, Rackspace uses OpenStack, which gives businesses the ability to run software or infrastructure on a scalable operating system that won’t lock them in to one, single cloud provider.

Myth 4: Too Many Issues to Move Data

Every large infrastructure move has its pros and cons. If the move isn’t executed properly, bugs and errors occur that take up more time than it’s worth. However, if done the right way with the right cloud support, the initiative to move to the cloud can be successful the first time. Your cloud host should help document and plan data transfers, and a disaster recovery plan should be created. Disaster recovery plans provide a rollback procedure and bug-fix documentation to account for any future issues.

Myth 5: Outsourcing to the Cloud Compromises My Job

Everyone likes job security, and some IT managers think that by hosting in the cloud, they move themselves out of a job. Managing data and resources are only part of an IT person’s job, and plenty of management resources are needed to scale, test, deploy and add to the cloud environment. Cloud host support teams ensure the internal hardware runs efficiently, but how the hardware and cloud resources are used is up to the business. Cloud hosting is meant to facilitate more convenient network management, and it does not threaten IT jobs.Don’t let the myths drive you away from a cloud upgrade that can benefit the business. The cloud offers the security and convenience for better, faster applications and infrastructure. 'Nuff said.

About the Author

Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer. She occasionally blogs for open cloud company Rackspace Hosting.

Want tips on tidying your cloud storage? (We know it can look messy sometimes, a good spring cleaning is always nice!) Check out the blog down below to read more!

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